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Finishing Tips

Get the most out of your print job by using the best finishes available.

Many print jobs are just run of the mill items like stationery and business forms, but when you want to impress your audience a special finish makes all the difference.

Consider these options:

Wire Stitching

Binding printed materials with wire by stapling the pages on the folded spine to produce a booklet.

Perfect Binding

A term used to describe a binding process in which the signatures of a book are held together by a flexible adhesive.

Wiro Binding

A method of binding individual pages together using a shaped wire which is inserted into punched holes and then crimped shut.

Folding

The process of converting the flat printed sheet into a folded section prior to trimming.

Embossing

Embossing raises an area of the surface of the paper or board from the background. It is particularly effective with headlines, logos and abstract shapes. Printed areas such as a logo or headline can be embossed to draw attention to them. An interesting alternative is blind embossing, where an unprinted area is embossed create a subtle effect.

Spot Varnishing

Varnish is only applied to specific areas on the sheet such as a picture or a text headline to make it stand out.

Laminating

A laminate finish on the outside of a folder or on the cover of a brochure will protect it from handling and make it stand out. Gloss laminate will give the job a brilliant high gloss finish that will be much more striking than an unlaminated sheet. Matt laminates give a much more subtle effect which slightly mutes the colours.

Perfect Binding or Sewn Binding

Normally brochures containing between eight and sixty pages are saddle stitched (stapled) but if you are looking for something different, why not consider perfect binding, or hand sewn binding.

Foil Blocking

Foil blocking applies a thin layer of metal foil, often gold or silver but you can choose from a wide range of colours. Foil blocking is more common on the spines of traditionally bound books but is also a popular technique for embellishing prestige brochures and corporate reports.